Kiwi Crew Stories (Demo)

 

Adrienne shark diving in Durban with some fellow AFM crew members! Photo courtesy of Jesse Spooner
Adrienne shark diving in Durban with some fellow AFM crew members! Photo courtesy of Jesse Spooner.

Housekeepers are essential to the running of our hospital ship. As Wairoa resident Adrienne Andresen told the Wairoa Star, “Without it being clean, it can’t do the work it needs to do.” Every one of our hundreds of crew members would completely agree.

Having already volunteered twice as a housekeeper, first in the Republic of Congo and then in Madagascar, Wairoa Star reports, “She is ‘definitely’ considering making the tour a third time. ‘It gets to be quite a close community.’ ‘You get addicted to it, I think it’s because it’s an entirely different way of life and so worth it.’”

Read Wairoa Star’s great article about her experiences here, and check out their website here.

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Kiwi Crew Stories (Demo)

NZ Mercy Ships Crew Scrum for the All Blacks Rugby World Cup 2015

 

Our kiwi crew on-board the Africa Mercy may be on the other side of the planet, but their hearts are RIGHT HERE WITH US AND OUR BOYS as they get their scrum on, have an ANZAC afternoon tea and then prep themselves with black war-paint (sometimes known as face-paint :P) in order to support our boys for The Big Event happening in less than 24 hours!!!

#ScrummingItUpOnTheAfricaMercy #DoingItForTheBoys #AllBlacksWorldDominationTomorrow #RWC2015 #NZRepresent

 

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Kiwi Crew Stories (Demo)

Photo Credit: Michelle Murrey; 3178_MSNW_LARRY_ROBBINS_MM; Larry ROBBINS, NZL, Second Officier, Navigator; Larry ROBBINS charts the course of the Africa Mercy along the coast of Africa; Larry helped navigate the Africa Mercy from Tenerife to Congo-Brazzaville for the 2013-2014 Field Service, and uniquely had the task of navigating the ship through the intersection of the Prime Meridian and the Equator

The hospital of the Africa Mercy is situated inside a ship. Without the hard work and skill of our dedicated seamen, our ship (and thus the hospital) would sink, double meaning intended. They are a crucial reason we are able to bring hope and healing to the forgotten poor.

Retired Royal New Zealand Navy commander and current acting director of Mercy Ships NZ, Larry Robbins, returned earlier this year from two months as deck officer aboard the Africa Mercy.

Prestigious NZ national current affairs magazine North & South featured his experience in this article by Janice Gillgren.

Photo Credit: Michelle Murrey

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Kiwi Crew Stories (Demo)

Photo Credit Ruben Plomp
Sue Clynes (R) with pre-op patient                                   Photo Credit Ruben Plomp

Have you ever wondered what a Mercy Ships nurse (such as kiwi OR nurse/maxillofacial team leader Sue Clynes) does at 5.45 a.m (“My alarm chirps and I quickly turn it off before it disturbs my husband John … After breakfast I head back to my cabin, take my antimalarial tablet, clean my teeth, put my hat on and leave for work, which takes me about 30 seconds as I just have to walk down one staircase”),10 p.m. (“Should be sleep time but I can’t stop thinking about storing those sutures”) and a whole bunch of times in between?

New Zealand’s Nursing Review have, and they have published a fantastic, insightful article about what a day for Sue Clynes is like, from which the above quotes were extracted – ‘A Day in the Life of a Mercy Ship Nurse.’

Read her story here.

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Kiwi Crew Stories (Demo)

Photo Credit Ruben Plomp, Eunice HIEW (NZL), WriterEunice Hiew – recently returned from Africa Mercy – has been featured on the online news site Stuff this week. Her story – which you can find here – featured in the Western Leader and tells of her time and experience on board in Madagascar.