2019 June

The National Awards for Fundraising Excellence has recognised the Mercy Ships NZ capital campaign as the best 2019 design and implementation of a planned giving campaign that truly connected with our major donors and increased the number of significant gifts to our charity.

The judges’ comments were;

Love that this campaign is primarily volunteer-led. Really like how much they pushed themselves to achieve their target. A solid, best-practice campaign.

 An outstanding campaign and very detailed submission; they really told the story how a small fundraising team faced down a major fundraising challenge and learnt a lot along the way. A successful capital project,  and a good example of how to work with high net worth donors on a large scale project.

 

Our grateful thanks to the Fundraising Institute of New Zealand (FINZ)to  Moceanic for sponsoring the award, our awesome partners at Giving Architects, and to our amazing, huge-hearted Capital Campaign Cabinet who have so passionately and successfully shared the story.

Capital Campaign Cabinet, Mercy Ships NZ

2019 June

The child-bride didn’t know exactly how old she was. Jatu thought she might be 15, but her playful grin and bright pink polka dot nail polish suggested she was a lot younger.
Jatu was one of the estimated two million girls and women in 2010 who suffered from obstetric fistula.
ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND THANK YOU’s, reflects upon the precious patients who received the 100,000 free surgical procedures provided by Mercy Ships since 1978.

 

2019 June

2019 June

2019 June

The National Awards for Fundraising Excellence has recognised the Mercy Ships NZ capital campaign as the best 2019 design and implementation of a planned giving campaign that truly connected with our major donors and increased the number of significant gifts to our charity.

The judges’ comments were;

Love that this campaign is primarily volunteer-led. Really like how much they pushed themselves to achieve their target. A solid, best-practice campaign.

 An outstanding campaign and very detailed submission; they really told the story how a small fundraising team faced down a major fundraising challenge and learnt a lot along the way. A successful capital project,  and a good example of how to work with high net worth donors on a large scale project.

 

Our grateful thanks to the Fundraising Institute of New Zealand (FINZ)to  Moceanic for sponsoring the award, our awesome partners at Giving Architects, and to our amazing, huge-hearted Capital Campaign Cabinet who have so passionately and successfully shared the story.

      Capital Campaign Cabinet, Mercy Ships NZ

2019 June

2019 June

Aicha, eyes patient, in the market with her mother before receiving surgery.

Fatmata took little Aicha with her every day to the local marketplace where they sat for hours selling oranges. Tragically, the impish two-year-old couldn’t see the colourful world around her due to the cataracts clouding her vision, but her family never lost hope that change was possible.

At the Mercy Ships eye screening, Aicha’s response to the flashlight’s beam of light was an indicator that there was hope: ‘It amazed me that something so small like seeing light was worth smiling about in her world of darkness… My heart was filled with joy to be able to offer her surgery that would open the world up to her in hopes she wears that smile more often,’ explained Larina , a volunteer Ophthalmic Clinical Technician.

In the wards of the Africa Mercy, Aicha’s larger-than-life curiosity was on display. She was already leaving her mark despite being unable see the world around her just yet.

Aicha, eyes patient, with her mother at home after her surgery.

There’s no force fiercer than a mother’s love for her child and Fatmata had proved this day by day as she protected her child from the cruel insults that came her way, ‘I love my baby, no matter what people said about her.’

After the remarkably short surgery Aicha’s life changed dramatically. Fatmata was filled with joy. ‘She is like a new person. She was dancing and laughing.’

Now Aicha not only senses her mother’s love, but she can also now see it reflected in plainly in her Mumma’s face. Aisha is stepping with new confidence into a very different future.

Thanks for your sponsorship that is helping make medical miracles happen.

 

2019 June

1993, Sierra Leone. As Catherine’s struggled to give birth, her family’s apprehension grew. After four days of labour without medical care, the 18- year-old was exhausted, frightened and in terrible pain. The life of both mum and baby hung in the balance. Read Baby Tina’s incredible story of survival and triumph here

2019 June

When Mofoudiya was born, her mother, Mabinty, was unable to truly enjoy her child’s bright eyes or sweet smile because of the worry that consumed her. Her daughter was born with a cleft lip, and the family had little access to medical help.

Other children would often make fun of Mofoudiya, even calling her a demon on occasion. This broke her mother’s heart. But without access to surgery, Mabinty had no choice but to hope and pray for a miracle.

When she heard that Mercy Ships was sailing into the capital city of Guinea, she knew this was her one chance to find help for her daughter. After a long journey from their village to the city, they waited to be seen by a team of medical professionals on board the Africa Mercy.

But long hours and longer lines left them coming back day after day, hoping to be seen. When a Mercy Ships nurse noticed little Mafoudiya standing with her mother, he immediately pulled them inside to be seen by a screening team. Now what seemed impossible just hours before became a reality, and Mafoudiya was given a surgery date!

After volunteer surgeons repaired her cleft lip, Mafoudiya’s radiant smile shone even brighter than before. Mabinty shared the joy of her little girl’s healing saying, ‘I waited for this for so long. I am so grateful…and so happy.’

Those on the Africa Mercy often see stories like Mafoudiya’s unfold, but those numbers seem to be decreasing. In Guinea this year, volunteer medical professionals saw significantly fewer cases of cleft lips than they were expecting. During a recent screening, over 6,000 people were seen, and only SIX children in that group showed signs of cleft lips.

This unusually small number is due in part to the training of local surgeons with the Mercy Ships Medical Capacity Building program. Over the past two years, local surgeons have repaired over 323 cleft lip cases in Guinea.

‘People have told me that doing any kind of mentoring in poor countries just doesn’t work, but I beg to differ,’ said Dr Gary Parker, Chief Medical Officer and Maxillofacial Surgeon. ‘We are here in one of the poorest nations on earth and it is working. They are taking care of their own people. I’m very excited about that.’